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The Supreme Court’s Not Done Yet

The Supreme Court’s Not Done Yet
The Supreme Court’s Not Done Yet

The Supreme Court’s Not Done Yet

On Friday, the Supreme Court delivered a decision that shocked the nation by overturning the precedent-setting Roe v. Wade case. However, the courtroom is in no way complete. They are still issuing significant rulings despite the fact that this session is drawing to a close. In addition, this one reinstates the religious freedom of a football coach.

The fact that high school football coach Joe Kennedy was seen praying on the 50-yard line after games led to his dismissal from his position. It seems that the administrators of schools in the state of Washington need to brush up on their knowledge of the First Amendment. Kennedy took the case all the way to the highest court in the land because he refused to let the government infringe on his rights.

In addition, the court decided by a vote count of 6-3 that his rights under the First Amendment had been violated by the municipal government. While writing his opinion on the case, Justice Neil Gorsuch stated that the First Amendment “doubly protected” his act of “engaging in a brief, quiet, personal religious observance” by praying on the field during the game. He also wrote that the local government had discriminated against the coach because they assumed it was their job to “ferret out and suppress” religious expression. This was included in his writing.

This is a huge victory for the rights guaranteed to all Americans by the First Amendment, and it should be celebrated by all Americans. The simple act of praying got this man fired from his job, which was completely unjustified. In these United States of America, something like that simply cannot occur. The coach didn’t make his players pray against their will, and he didn’t even make other people listen to his prayers.

It is difficult not to assume that the school board simply wanted to eliminate any visible religious actions in public and to discourage teachers and students from exercising their rights. The decision was made in favor by the court with a vote count of 6-3, with the liberal justices dissenting. One is compelled to ponder the motivations of any judge or justice who would be opposed to a man’s constitutionally protected right to pray.

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